LEYLA BLUE RELEASES DEBUT EP “SONGS FOR BOYS THAT DIDN’T TEXT ME BACK” OUT TODAY VIA ISLAND RECORDS!

INTRODUCING 2020 ARTIST TO WATCH LEYLA BLUE
SINGER/SONGWRITER RELEASES DEBUT EP
SONGS FOR BOYS THAT DIDN’T TEXT ME BACK, OUT TODAY VIA ISLAND RECORDS

OVER 1 MILLION GLOBAL ARTIST STREAMS ON FIRST TWO TRACKS
“SILENCE” AND “WHAT A SHAME”

Introducing New York city native singer and songwriter Leyla Blue whose first pair of soul-drenched singles, Silence and What A Shame have amassed over 1 million cumulative streams.  Leyla now releases her stunning debut EP Songs For Boys That Didn’t Text Me Back, available via Island Records.  Following the arrival of Songs For Boys That Didn’t Text Me Back, Leyla will be dropping the official music video for “Silence” on Monday, November 25th.  Sonically, Leyla is described as the offspring of Lorde and Destiny’s Child.  On her music she states, “My music is never about me. It’s just me going, ‘This is my shit and how I deal with it. What’s yours?’ I hope by doing so I can inspire others to open up and accept themselves.”

ABOUT LEYLA BLUE:

From her detached vantage point, the 20-year-old New York-born singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist sees everything clearly as she filters the chaos into empowered and enigmatic pop laced with throwback R&B energy. Streamed over 1 million times on her first two releases and signed to Island Records, the songstress catalyzes moments of insecurity into confidence, going “From ‘Sad Bitch’ to ‘Bad Bitch’,” as she so eloquently puts it.

“My music is essentially an extension of the voice inside of my head,” she admits. “In social settings, it was like I was exploding inside, because of how I much I felt like I didn’t belong. I was miserable. I learned there was no way around these inner battles—only through them. I didn’t become confident in who I am by denying the shit I’ve gone through, I’ve had to own it. I came to terms with my issues through making music.”

“Silence” merely opens up the narrative of the EP. Set off by the sound of a poured drink, creaky guitar, and sarcastic, yet soaring delivery, the fiery “What A Shame” laments, “how wack it is that guys often prefer when girls act stupid to when we use our brain and voice.” In between heavenly crooning and a skittering groove, the airy conclusion “I Don’t Wanna Know” represents an important decision, “to leave the party and stop hanging out with him every weekend.”